Stranger by Night

2020-08-31T14:45:56+00:00New Books, Poetry|

“Tender and unflinching . . . Hirsch balances heartfelt elegy with a celebration of the everyday. In these 48 poems of sensory remembrance, any door might open on the past . . . While later poems address Hirsch’s loss of eyesight, giving resonance to the collection’s title, readers will be grateful that the

Gabriel a Poem

2020-08-31T15:20:29+00:00New Books, Poetry|

Longlisted for the 2014 National Book Award Never has there been a book of poems quite like Gabriel, in which a short life, a bewildering death, and the unanswerable sorrow of a father come together in such a sustained elegy. This unabashed sequence speaks directly from Hirsch’s heart to our own, without sentimentality.

The Living Fire

2020-08-31T15:19:35+00:00New Books, Poetry|

A comprehensive selection of one of our most beloved poet’s rich and significant body of work alongside a gathering of “brilliant, deeply pleasurable” new poems (Booklist). Pages: 256 pages Publisher: Knopf (2013) Language: English ISBN-13: 978-0375710032 Amazon.com BarnesAndNoble.com Books-A-Million.com IndieBound.com Early Sunday Morning I used to mock my father and

How to Read a Poem

2020-08-31T15:13:48+00:00New Books, Prose|

"Hirsch's contribution is significant, [grounded] in the obvious pleasure he has experienced through words. . . . Who could resist the wiles of this poetry-broker-a writer rapidly becoming the baby boomers' preeminent man of letters?" —Detroit Free Press Pages: 368 pages Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (1999) Language: English ISBN-13:978-0156005661 Amazon.com BarnesAndNoble.com Books-A-Million.com IndieBound.com

Responsive reading

2020-08-31T15:42:59+00:00New Books, Prose|

This collection brims with wide-ranging encounters and explorations, fundamental discoveries, and reconsiderations. It is a book of deep, attentive, and appreciative readings. In Responsive Reading, reading itself is treated as a creative act, an intimate, triggering, and momentous activity. The collection begins with a reconsideration of the "J" author, the most ancient and humanly

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